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Wednesday, 05 September 2018

Spotlight falls on African poverty during international conference

Dr Larry Jowah, a senior lecturer in the Department of Management and Project Management, addresses the 5th International LAMIPISA Conference which is hosted by CPUT. Dr Larry Jowah, a senior lecturer in the Department of Management and Project Management, addresses the 5th International LAMIPISA Conference which is hosted by CPUT.

Modelling Africa out of poverty requires understanding in its historical, social, political and economic contexts as it is multidimensional and difficult to measure.

This is the view of Prof Jonathan Makuwira, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the Malawi University of Science and Technology. On Monday, Makuwira was delivering the keynote speech during the 5th International LAMIPISA Conference hosted by CPUT’s Department of Management & Project Management.

He argued that the criminality of poverty cannot only be seen in the lack of materials, food and shelter but also in the social and0 public institutions. “It is so subtle that one can hardly notice its violence, poverty is not only violence but also a crime against humanity.”

He added that while African states gained independence as a result of efforts of ordinary people, rather than political elites, who were fighting for their rights this objective was later replaced by the concept of development.

“Their poverty became the main problem of development .Therefore the Africans were problematized – the solution? Development! ”

Held under the theme “Modelling Africa out of chronic poverty”, the three-day conference is a melting pot of multi-disciplinary research and industry practices, encouraging global networking.

Prof Paul Green, Dean of the Faculty of Business and Management Sciences, said joblessness was the biggest challenge facing the country’s democratic government.

“The failure of the economy to match the growing labour force to job opportunities is a structural and fundamental problem,” argued Green. “The problem is further exacerbated by an economy characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity.”

He added that when using the Gini-coefficient measure, inequality increased from 0.64 in 1995 to 0.69 in 2005, although it did improve to 0.65 in 2010/11. He, however, was excited about the future.

“In Industry 4.0 we are entering an era of tremendous opportunities and innovation is the key to sustainability, empowerment and growth in small business, digitisation and technology.”                                    

Written by Kwanele Butana

Email: butanak@cput.ac.za

Provides coverage for the Business and Management Sciences and Education Faculties, Student Affairs Department and Cape Town and Mowbray Campuses.