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Graduation: Faculties of Business and Management Sciences Official start: December 10 @ 9:00 am. Duration: 2h 30m

Monday, 23 April 2018

CPUT academics obtain doctorates from Rhodes

LINGUISTICS FUNDIS: From left, Dr Zakhile Somlata, CPUT's Prof Monwabisi Ralarala who co-supervised the graduates, Dr Xolani Mavela, Prof Russell Kaschula, main supervisor, Dr Sithembele Marawu and Rhodes' Dr Mhlobo Jadezweni at a graduation ceremony at Rhodes University recently LINGUISTICS FUNDIS: From left, Dr Zakhile Somlata, CPUT's Prof Monwabisi Ralarala who co-supervised the graduates, Dr Xolani Mavela, Prof Russell Kaschula, main supervisor, Dr Sithembele Marawu and Rhodes' Dr Mhlobo Jadezweni at a graduation ceremony at Rhodes University recently

A trio of our academics were recently awarded degrees as language doctors at Rhodes University during this year’s graduation season.

Thanks to CPUT's Prof Monwabisi Ralarala (co-supervisor) who was instrumental in the formation of a collaborative relationship between CPUT’s Language Unit and Rhodes University’s School of Languages, headed by Prof Russell Kaschula (main supervisor). All the three research projects would not have been possible without the financial support of the Teaching and Development Grant.

They were capped at the same graduation ceremony in Grahamstown, Eastern Cape. Sithembele Marawu, a lecturer in the Business and Management Sciences Faculty, Xolani Mavela and Zakhile Somlata in the Education Faculty were excited about their graduation.

The title of Somlata’s thesis is: “A critique of language policy and implementation strategies used in selected institutions of higher learning in South Africa”.

His thesis evaluated the language policy implementation strategies used in selected universities of South Africa, as most universities have their language policies, but the dilemma is on the implementation of those language policies.

“The overarching aim of the study was to evaluate how a university uses language policy for access and success of the students and to assess the language policy implementation strategies, monitoring and evaluation.

“My knowledge on language policy implementation in higher education will be useful for me to play a role in breaking all the language barriers that disadvantage the majority of South African students in Higher Education,” says Somlata.

Mavela’s thesis is written in isiXhosa and entitled: Uphando-nzulu lweeMpendulo eziBhaliweyo zaBafundi bamaBanga aPhezulu eMfundo kuNcwadi lwesiXhosa.

The study investigates the causes of poor performance in written responses on isiXhosa literature assessments by FET Home Language and First Additional Language students. The researcher uses a mixed-method approach to gather his data and also provides measures to improve learner performance in isiXhosa literature assessments in both isiXhosa Home Language and First Additional Language levels.

“I am so happy to hear from various stakeholders that the study will contribute immensely towards a better pedagogy in isiXhosa literature and will easily spread to other African Languages as well,” says Mavela.

He was profiled in the Is`olezwe lesiXhosa newspaper for this achievement.

Marawu’s thesis explored the use of code-switching as a pedagogical strategy in bi/multilingual classroom settings.

His thesis was prompted by the widespread use of code-switching in classrooms, particularly in South African rural and township schools.

Written by Kwanele Butana

Email: butanak@cput.ac.za

Provides coverage for the Business and Management Sciences and Education Faculties, Student Affairs Department and Cape Town and Mowbray Campuses.