For more information click here >>>

For more information   Click here >>>

click here >>>

Tuesday, 03 May 2016

Needs driven research pays off

RESEARCH FOR GOOD: Researchers at the Functional Foods Research Unit have come up with a unique product range to ensure children get the right dose of micronutrients. The product range stems from the Nutri-Caro E patent RESEARCH FOR GOOD: Researchers at the Functional Foods Research Unit have come up with a unique product range to ensure children get the right dose of micronutrients. The product range stems from the Nutri-Caro E patent

From biscuits to peanut butter and cereal, researchers at the Functional Foods Research Unit have come up with a unique product range to ensure children get the right dose of micronutrients such as minerals, Vitamin A and E.

The development of the product range stems from the Nutri-Caro E patent, a unique formula that contains a blend of carotenes, minerals, and Vitamin E, which was developed by Prof Spinney Benade and Dr Maretha Opperman.

Benade says their research activities are all “need driven” and when a clinical trial they conducted in the Eastern Cape revealed a high rate of Vitamin E deficiency in children, the unit set about to address this problem.

“Vitamin E is crucial for the neurological development of children. So we had to do something to help these children at an early stage, otherwise their development will be affected,” says Benade.

The researchers developed a biscuit using their unique formula and over a period of six months pre-schoolers in an Eastern Cape community consumed two biscuits a day.

At the start of the clinical trial, tests revealed that 71% of the participants had a vitamin E deficiency. However, after six months of daily eating the biscuit, Benade says the vitamin E deficiency dropped to 6%.

When consumption stopped, the vitamin E as well as vitamin A deficiencies tended to return.

Benade says the biscuits have been well received by the participants.

“We produce targeted products that are backed up with scientific research,” he says.

Opperman says apart from the biscuit, they also developed a peanut butter spread, infant cereal and a pre-mix that can be added as an ingredient to recipes.

Opperman says the products have been developed specifically for the non-profit sector, who is involved in various communities and school feeding schemes.

The products have already been rolled out in the Western Cape and have been well received.

*For more information on the Functional Food Research Unit see: http://www.cput.ac.za/academic/faculties/appliedsciences/research/ffru

Written by Candes Keating

Tel: +27 21 959 6311
Email: keatingc@cput.ac.za

Provides coverage for the Engineering and Applied Sciences Faculties; the Bellville and Wellington Campuses, and research and innovation news.