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Graduation: Faculties of Business and Management Sciences Official start: December 10 @ 9:00 am. Duration: 2h 30m

Tuesday, 17 September 2019

Alumni networking event inspires women

DON’T WASTE TIME: Event organiser Valerie Deelman with Master of Ceremonies Prof Penelope Engel-Hills and guest speakers Saray Khumalo and Crystal Orderson DON’T WASTE TIME: Event organiser Valerie Deelman with Master of Ceremonies Prof Penelope Engel-Hills and guest speakers Saray Khumalo and Crystal Orderson

We all get the same 24 hour day, how you choose to use it is your prerogative according to two inspirational female pioneers.

Saray Khumalo, the first black African female to summit Mount Everest, and Crystal Orderson, a political commentator and renowned journalist, were the guest speakers at a CPUT Alumni networking event recently.

Khumalo had three unsuccessful attempts at scaling Mount Everest before succeeding on her fourth try. Using the four experiences as metaphors for life she explained how mountaineering has built characteristics like resilience, fortitude and determination in her.

Orderson explained how she arrived at the former Peninsula Technikon to enrol in Journalism, with no train ticket or money to study, but with a steely determination to study and make a success of herself.

Fast forward two decades, and Orderson is a successful freelancer who is in demand for her incisive commentary, especially on West African politics, and has an impressive portfolio of work from the SABC, Radio 702 and TRT World- a Turkish television station, amongst others.

“I arrived here in 1997 and later went on to Masters Studies, in other countries, and working around the world but I can honestly say that it is the foundation that was laid here at CPUT that took me through my career,” he says.

Responding to a question from the largely female audience on how they managed busy careers while parenting their children both Khumalo and Orderson said it was exactly this that made them better mothers.

“Yes climbing Mount Everest is dangerous but I could just as easily pass away driving to work as I would on the mountain. We all get the same 24 hour day and you make a decision on how you want to spend that time. I would say ‘Find the time’ if there is something you aspire to doing,” said Khumalo.

Orderson echoed her sentiment, ‘I love my daughter but ultimately I think she will be better off for seeing me work hard to provide for her. I don’t feel guilty about that’.

Written by Lauren Kansley

Tel: +27 21 953 8646
Email: kansleyl@cput.ac.za

Liaises with the media and writes press releases about interesting developments at CPUT.