Report any gender-based violence related incidents to the following numbers | 021 959 6550 | 021 959 6301 | 060 980 0286

Friday, 02 August 2019

Students and homeless youth sell food

PAYING IT FORWARD: Students helped youth from Baphumelele Fountain of Hope Farm in the Philippi Horticultural Area to make foods and beverages which they sold at a Market Day. PAYING IT FORWARD: Students helped youth from Baphumelele Fountain of Hope Farm in the Philippi Horticultural Area to make foods and beverages which they sold at a Market Day.

Consumer Science students recently helped homeless youth from the Baphumelele Fountain of Hope Farm to make foods and beverages from the farm’s produce which they sold during a Market Day.

The Market Day was held on the farm in the Philippi Horticultural Area where foods such as Sesame seed peanuts, Raisin and coconut balls, Pilchard and spinach sandwiches and pasta as well as beverages such as Rooibos ice tea with lemon flavour and Ginger beer were on sale.

The second-year students used the skills they gained over the one-an-a-half years of studying Food and Nutrition to help the youth to make and sell food as well as trained them on costing.

Service Learning Co-ordinator in the Department of Consumer Science, Theloshni Govender, said the event was aimed at empowering the farm’s youth.

“We hope they [students] learn communication, teamwork and soft skills. The department has been working with the Farm for the past three years,” said Govender. “I hope the students will learn to share skills and derive joy from the fact that they have made someone else happy by teaching them something.”

Noah Malete, Programmes Officer and also the farm’s caretaker, said the farm is a residential facility for homeless youth between the ages of 18 to 21.  

“Today is about showing off what the homeless youth can do when supported. As all the products on sale were produced by them,” said Malete.

“We run a skills development programme in which we equip them with agricultural skills, computer studies, financing and budgeting, housekeeping, work-readiness and even job placements with the programme’s partners.”

Owen Mdledle, Baphumelele Programme Manager, said it’s a mutual benefit for both the students and youth.

“The youth are exposed to their equals who are empowered by education and they get motivated to study further despite their backgrounds. CPUT has been a phenomenal partner.”

Mdledle added that they want to teach the youth that farming is not boring.

Written by Kwanele Butana

Email: butanak@cput.ac.za

Provides coverage for the Business and Management Sciences and Education Faculties, Student Affairs Department and Cape Town and Mowbray Campuses.