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Thursday, 13 December 2018

Graduate defies disability to achieve dream

CONGRATULATIONS: BTech: Public Management graduate, Andile Magqabi, was capped yesterday during the Faculty of Business and Management Sciences’ graduation ceremony. CONGRATULATIONS: BTech: Public Management graduate, Andile Magqabi, was capped yesterday during the Faculty of Business and Management Sciences’ graduation ceremony.

A determined graduate has overcome a mobility disability and other challenges to obtain his BTech: Public Management degree.

Andile Magqabi was capped on Wednesday during the Faculty of Business and Management Sciences’ graduation ceremony.

He is wheelchair bound and became paralysed after surviving a shooting incident in Gugulethu in December 2015. He completed his diploma at CPUT in 2016 and says that’s when things changed completely.

Accessing facilities on campus was a challenge as some lecture rooms were not accessible by wheelchair.

“Nonetheless, there were friends and classmates who were willing to assist me,” adds the Alice-born graduate. “The lecturers were understanding and gave me additional time to complete assessments.”

He says his lecturers were very supportive of his academic development and general welfare. “They would give me time off to see doctors and email me lecture notes when I missed class.”

He also thanks the Disability Unit for assisting differently abled students by listening and attending to their concerns.

“CPUT taught me self-discipline, respect and meaning to the axiom that whatever you’re going through in life you’re not alone,” recalls the Sandenberg Residence’s senior student.

“I went to church for the first time here at CPUT and learnt that God is able and willing and that where there’s a will there’s a way.”

He thanks his parents and friends as well his lecturers Altee Whittaker and Dr Stan Cronje, who is a pillar of strength in Andile’s life and a parent not only to him but to the rest of the students.

He says differently abled students fear going to school because of the pressure to perform from able-bodied students and more can be done to make facilities accessible to wheelchair bound and visually-impaired students.

Written by Kwanele Butana

Email: butanak@cput.ac.za

Provides coverage for the Business and Management Sciences and Education Faculties, Student Affairs Department and Cape Town and Mowbray Campuses.