Report any gender-based violence related incidents to the following numbers | 021 959 6550 | 021 959 6301 | 060 980 0286

Thursday, 02 November 2017

Multilingualism and decolonised curriculum take centre stage at Indaba

LANGUAGE FUNDIS: Fundani’s Theo Rodrigues and Nomxolisi Jantjies, Bridget Wyrley-Birch (Faculty of Health & Wellness), and Professors Chrissy Boughey (Rhodes University), Sivakumar Sivasubramaniam (University of the Western Cape) and Ken Barris (Engineering Faculty) during the 2017 Language Indaba LANGUAGE FUNDIS: Fundani’s Theo Rodrigues and Nomxolisi Jantjies, Bridget Wyrley-Birch (Faculty of Health & Wellness), and Professors Chrissy Boughey (Rhodes University), Sivakumar Sivasubramaniam (University of the Western Cape) and Ken Barris (Engineering Faculty) during the 2017 Language Indaba

Collaboration between content lecturers and their language counterparts can improve learning and teaching.

The role of content lecturers in teaching of language and literacies was discussed robustly at a Language Indaba held recently by the Language Working Group in collaboration with Fundani Centre for Higher Education Development’s Language Unit on the Bellville Campus.

This developmental initiative by CPUT was not only meant to initiate the interests of academics in the domain of Multilingualism in Higher Education and language development but also meant to explore a progressive dialogue in relation to viable strategies and possible interventions that could improve access to learning and possibly contribute to effective teaching.

“All lecturers should be of the view that they have responsibility to contribute to language teaching for betterment of their students,” says Nomxolisi Jantjies, Xhosa Language Specialist at CPUT.

“Therefore, the multi-literacies students bring with them should not only be seen as a challenge or hindrance but as a resource that they can tap into to gain access to the epistemologies of content specific language.”

Rhodes University’s Prof Chrissy Boughey said the most dominant understanding of curriculum decolonization is that it involves the inclusion of African content and thought and that the use of indigenous languages as languages of learning and teaching also featured strongly.

Boughey added that the use of indigenous languages as media of instruction impacts on the identity and well-being of students.

Prof. Sivakumar Sivasubramaniam, Head of Language Education at the University of the Western Cape, said students are not a statistics but have a voice and therefore should be heard.

Sivasubramaniam argued that students’ competencies can be maximized through giving them platforms to speak and practice their views.  

Written by Kwanele Butana

Email: butanak@cput.ac.za

Provides coverage for the Business and Management Sciences and Education Faculties, Student Affairs Department and Cape Town and Mowbray Campuses.